Category Archives: Volume 31, No. 2

Mat Callahan, The Explosion of Deferred Dreams: Musical Renaissance and Social Revolution in San Francisco, 1965–1975

(Oakland, CA: PM Press, 2016), xxx + 308 pp., $22.95 California native, veteran musician, philosopher and revolutionary Mat Callahan covers a lot of ground in his new book about the tumultuous decade of 1965-75 in the San Francisco Bay Area. … Continue reading

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Enzo Traverso, Fire and Blood: The European Civil War 1914-1945

(New York, Verso: 2016), 293 pp., $16.95 As we observe the centennials of the First World War and the October Revolution, we are reminded of the role played by violence in the political and cultural changes occurring during and between … Continue reading

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Kim Scipes (ed.), Building Global Labor Solidarity in a Time of Accelerating Globalization

(Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2014), 259 pp. The changing strategies of the international labor solidarity movement reflect trends on the left and worldwide beginning with the rise of the New Left in the 1960s and globalization in the 1980s. The recognition … Continue reading

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Ann Snitow. Feminism of Uncertainty: A Gender Diary

(Durham: Duke University Press, 2015), 378 pp., $26.95 Written in the form of a non-linear diary, Ann Snitow’s Feminism of Uncertainty: A Gender Diary is divided into five parts. Part I, “Continuing a Gender Diary,” carries over the conversation from … Continue reading

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Basuli Deb, Transnational Feminist Perspectives on Terror in Literature and Culture

(New York and London: Routledge, 2015), 232 pp., $148 In a milieu of heightened Islamophobic and racist attitudes across the globe, Basuli Deb’s book is a must read. The book disrupts the designation of terrorism to racialized bodies, in a … Continue reading

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Sheila Rowbotham, Rebel Crossings: New Women, Free Lovers, and Radicals in Britain and the United States

(London: Verso, 2016), 502 pp., $34.95. Rebels with Many Causes I first heard the name Helena Born in a graduate course taught by the historian of anarchism Paul Avrich. A neglected figure in both British and American radical history, Born … Continue reading

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Andrew Cornell, Unruly Equality: U.S. Anarchism in the Twentieth Century

(Berkeley: University of California Press), 2016, 416 pp., $29.95 Thanks no doubt to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the growing sense that social movements are likely to spring up almost of their own accord, and then fall away, … Continue reading

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John Bellamy Foster and Paul Burkett, Marx and the Earth: An Anti-Critique

 (Leiden: Brill, 2016), 326 pp., $149 With the increased threat of climate change and the growing recognition that business as usual responses cannot adequately deal with it, John Bellamy Foster and Paul Burkett’s Marx and the Earth: An Anti-Critique makes … Continue reading

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Lebowitz, Michael A., The Socialist Imperative: From Gotha to Now

(New York: Monthly Review Press, 2015), 224 pp., $22.00. We live in a time of increasing peril and dizzying contradiction. Nowhere is this more evident than in the rise of Donald Trump – a billionaire born with a gold-plated silver … Continue reading

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John Feffer, Splinterlands

(Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2016), 151 pp., $13.95 Fears of Fragmentation In his controversial study of the decline of capitalism, How Will Capitalism End? (2016), Wolfgang Streeck, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cologne, envisages the termination of today’s “failing … Continue reading

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