Category Archives: 73

Government vs. Constitutionality: On the Subject of Due Process

By Steve Martinot Introduction In May 2015, in the middle of the night, three students in Berkeley were stopped by local police a few blocks from campus. They were walking home after late-night studying for finals. Two of them, a … Continue reading

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Chad Pearson, Reform or Repression: Organizing America’s Anti-Union Movement

(Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016), 303 pp., $55. Chad Pearson’s book provides an alternative perspective on the growth of the anti-union movement in the US. Through studying employers’ associations and civic organizations, the author argues that the open shop … Continue reading

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Megan Erickson, Class War: The Privatization of Childhood

(New York: Verso, 2015), 230 pp., $16.95. It’s a political truism that the easiest and most emotionally effective way to hammer home a point is to gesture to the children. Who, we’re asked, will think of the children? “The children”—specifically … Continue reading

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Heidi Hoechst, Life in and Against the Odds: Debts of Freedom and the Speculative Roots of U.S. Culture

(Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2015), 284 pp., $34.95 When is a history not a history? When it drowns its story in a swamp of commentary. When is commentary not commentary? When it pretends to tell a story that it assumes … Continue reading

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Bryan D. Palmer, Marxism and Historical Practice, Vol. I & Vol. II

Bryan D. Palmer, Marxism and Historical Practice, Vol. I: Interpretive Essays on Class Formation and Class Struggle (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2015), 526 pp., $206;  Bryan D. Palmer, Marxism and Historical Practice, Vol. II: Interventions and Appreciations (Leiden and Boston: … Continue reading

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Howard Brick, Robbie Lieberman, and Paula Rabinowitz, eds., Lineages of the Literary Left: Essays in Honor of Alan M. Wald

(Ann Arbor, MI: Maize Books, 2015), 406 pp., $37.50. Few figures on the left have managed to so define a field of study that their absence would seem incomprehensible to anyone looking at research and writing in the area. It … Continue reading

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Wang Hui (Saul Thomas ed.), China’s Twentieth Century: Revolution, Retreat and the Road to Equality

(London and New York: Verso, 2016), 368 pp., $29.95. China’s Twentieth Century is a new collection of Wang Hui’s essays edited by Saul Thomas and translated by a diverse group of scholars. Wang is a prominent figure in “the New … Continue reading

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Henry Giroux, America’s Addiction to Terrorism, with a foreword by Michael D. Yates

(New York: Monthly Review Press, 2016), 288 pp., $20. Henry Giroux is one of our foremost critical voices. With America’s Addiction to Terrorism, he once again applies his critical pedagogy to the US, finding a common thread of growing authoritarian … Continue reading

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You Are Not a Marxist on Your Own

Review essay by Robert Cohen Wolfgang Fritz Haug, “Marxistsein/Marxistinsein.” Historisch-kritisches Wörterbuch des Marxismus (Historical-Critical Dictionary of Marxism). Wolfgang Fritz Haug et al. (eds.). Hamburg: Argument. Vol. 8/II (2015), Columns 1965-2026 (referred to in the text by column [col.] number). Every now … Continue reading

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Biological Warfare in the Korean War: Allegations and Cover-up

By Thomas Powell I I weigh into the subject of biological warfare (BW) with trepidation. It’s not my field of study. It was in fact, my father’s topic which he researched quite thoroughly, both in China in 1951-53, and later … Continue reading

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