Category Archives: Volume 29, No. 2

Brian King, So Long, Vietnam

(Seattle: Thirty Second Street Raccoons Publishing, 2013) So Long, Vietnam, a muscular, vigorous, even darkly comic, antiwar novel about the Vietnam War, is built around the premise: “What if Richard Nixon gave a 1970 invasion of Cambodia and the US … Continue reading

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Fredric Jameson, Representing Capital: A Reading of Volume One

(New York: Verso, 2011) Fredric Jameson’s career as a literary critic and social theorist has been defined by the exchange between his political and intellectual commitment to Marxism, and his engagement with a series of more recent (and often competing) … Continue reading

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Mark Naison, Badass Teachers Unite!

(Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2014) This little book is comprised of essays and posts by Mark Naison, a professor of African-American Studies and History at Fordham University, who became outraged at so-called reformers who blame teachers for the failures of the … Continue reading

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Exchange on “Socialist Democracy and Solidarity”

Richard Schmitt replies to his critics: George Snedeker (GS) reads my article [in S&D, March 2015] as a plea for ‘being good,’ as a “voluntaristic… psychological theory of democracy.” He misses a discussion of “class relations and class power.” He … Continue reading

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Ravi Malhotra and Morgan Rowe, Exploring Disability Identity and Disability Rights through Narratives: Finding a Voice of Their Own

(New York: Routledge, 2014) How do disabled people understand and articulate their experiences of oppression and marginalization? What methodological and interpretive issues are at stake when study participants shape the course of research by relating their life stories? What lessons … Continue reading

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John Marsh, In Walt We Trust (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2015).

Unscrew the locks from the doors! Unscrew the doors themselves from their jambs! — Walt Whitman In Walt We Trust is an unusual book. It is neither a work of literary criticism nor a book about politics in the traditional … Continue reading

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Reply to Schmitt, by Victor Wallis

Richard Schmitt, in his original article, failed to discuss the social basis for solidarity. He still fails to do so. No one denies that solidarity is a requisite to building socialism, but the question was how to extend it beyond … Continue reading

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Leonard Covello with Guido D’Agostino, The Heart is the Teacher. Afterword by Gerald Meyer

(New York: Calandra Italian American Institute, 2013) Pedagogy of Place Leonard Covello’s The Heart is the Teacher, originally published in 1958, is at once the autobiography of an Italian immigrant and an insightful treatise on the transformative power of community-centered … Continue reading

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Luciana Castellina, Discovery of the World: A Political Awakening in the Shadow of Mussolini

(London and New York: Verso, 2014) The political life of Luciana Castellina, one of the most prominent voices of the Italian Left for many decades, is a magnificent portrait, satiated with courageous shades of red, always with an uncompromising commitment … Continue reading

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The Prescience of Lucio Magri

By Darko Suvin Lucio Magri. The Tailor of Ulm: Communism in the Twentieth century, translated by Patrick Camiller (London: Verso, 2011). Magri, born in 1932, was a leading member and, together with Rossana Rossanda, the most prominent theoretician of the … Continue reading

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