Category Archives: 65

The Strength of Our Collective Voice: Views of Labor Leaders from Around the World

by Babak Amini The International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) was a groundbreaking effort to give power to the most exploited, voice to the voiceless, and collective cohesion to the most fractured. It was due to its uncompromising dedication to the working … Continue reading

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Marcello Musto, ed., Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (London: Bloomsbury, 2014)

What is most distinctive about this book is that, instead of being about “Marx and the International,” it is about the International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) itself – though fully recognizing the important role that Marx played within it. This makes … Continue reading

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The German War on American Workers: Deutsche Telekom in the United States

by Tony Daley* For the last twenty-five years, income and wealth in the U.S. have shifted to the wealthiest Americans. Workers’ wages have stagnated while productivity (output per hour of work) has increased by 25 percent. In real terms, median … Continue reading

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The International Working Class in 1864 and Today

by Ricardo Antunes Introduction The International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) was born in London on September 28, 1864. Its founders, together with Marx, were a distinguished group of communist, socialist and anarchist intellectuals and activists, who dedicated to the project an … Continue reading

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Race, Internationalism and Labor: Reflections upon the 150th Anniversary of the First International

by Bill Fletcher, Jr. If the emancipation of the working classes requires their fraternal concurrence, how are they to fulfill that great mission with a foreign policy in pursuit of criminal designs, playing upon national prejudices, and squandering in piratical … Continue reading

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A Common Banner: Marxists and Anarchists in the First International

by Michael Löwy I Marxists and Anarchists (these terms were not usual at that time) were part of the International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) – the First International – since its origin in 1864. The disagreements between partisans of Marx and … Continue reading

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Capitalist Crisis, Cooperative Labor, and the Conquest of Political Power: Marx’s ‘Inaugural Address’ (1864) and Its Relevance in the Current Moment

by Michael Joseph Roberto In the fall of 1864, Karl Marx was hard at work in London to complete the first volume of Capital when he chose to exit the study and put theory at the service of practice. Marx had … Continue reading

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Marx and the Politics of the First International

by George C. Comninel The founding of the First International In 1859, Karl Marx published A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy in Berlin.1 This constituted only the first part of the first book of the six books he … Continue reading

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Barriers and Openings to a New Socialist Internationalism: South African Histories, Strategies and Narratives

by Patrick Bond* Introduction: pre-1994 South African internationalism The 1864 meeting of the International Workingmen’s Association (IWA) brought the universality of proletarian ideas and representatives into focus. At St Martin’s Hall in London, delegates converged from France, Italy, Ireland, Poland … Continue reading

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Notes on the History of the International

Marcello Musto Opening Steps On 28 September 1864, St. Martin’s Hall in the very heart of London was packed to overflowing with some two thousand workmen.1 They had come to attend a meeting called by English trade union leaders and … Continue reading

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