Category Archives: Volume 28, No. 1

Mark Zuss, The Practice of Theoretical Curiosity (New York: Springer, 2012) reviewed by Michael E. Brown

Mark Zuss introduces The Practice of Theoretical Curiosity as an attempt to develop “a historical profile of curiosity’s places and appearances in contemporary life.” This assumes that “theoretical projects are always socially and institutionally conditioned,” that they transpire in a … Continue reading

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Ernesto Che Guevara. The Awakening of Latin America (North Melbourne: Ocean Press, 2013) reviewed by Daniel Egan

In his eulogy of Che Guevara given at the Plaza de La Revolución in October 1967, Fidel Castro referred to Che as an ‘artist’ of revolution. As this collection of Che’s writings on Latin America suggests, Fidel’s statement was no … Continue reading

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Anthonia C. Kalu, Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi, and Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka, eds., Reflections: An Anthology of New Work by African Women Poets (Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2013) reviewed by George Fish

The appearance of this anthology is a momentous publishing event, both aesthetically and politically. Aesthetically in that it brings together previously unpublished poems by seventy-one African women poets from sixteen different countries, with all of the poetic contributions substantive and … Continue reading

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Eugene Gogol, Toward a Dialectic of Philosophy and Organization (Leiden: Brill, 2012) reviewed by Kevin O’Brien

Raya Dunayevskaya (1910-1987) has attracted considerably less scholarly attention than C.L.R. James, her onetime co-leader of the influential-beyond-its-size dissenting current of American Trotskyism known as the Johnson-Forest Tendency (JFT). While interest in James understandably stems in part from the wide … Continue reading

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Basil Fernando, Narrative of Justice, told through stories of torture victims (Hong Kong: Asian Human Rights Commission, 2013) reviewed by George Katsiaficas

Something is rotten in the “democratic socialist” state of Sri Lanka. Since 1971, tens of thousands of people have disappeared.  Daily abuse of civilians by police and military personnel is now routine—and goes unpunished. Sexual torture through sticks and hot … Continue reading

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Reply to Lyons, by Efe Can Gürcan

Matthew Lyons, using emotional language, targets me rather than the original arguments that I advanced in my essay. Lyons accuses me of “completely whitewashing Alexander Dugin,” whereas I make clear from the outset that Dugin’s Eurasianism is replete with severe … Continue reading

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Matthew Lyons’ Letter to the Editor

Dear Socialism and Democracy, I was disturbed to read Efe Can Gürcan’s review essay “NATO’s ‘Globalized’ Atlanticism and the Eurasian Alternative” (Socialism and Democracy vol. 27, no. 2). Gürcan details the rise of (neo-)Eurasianism as an ideological challenge to NATO … Continue reading

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George Katsiaficas, Asia’s Unknown Uprisings, Vol. 2: People Power in the Philippines, Burma, Tibet, China, Taiwan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Thailand, and Indonesia. (Oakland, CA: PM Press, 2013) reviewed by Mark Driscoll

Being a leftist academic means that some days I wake up on the activist side of the bed, and some days on the academic side. Then again, after a whole day reading a breakthrough text like Asia’s Unknown Uprisings, I … Continue reading

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Myrna Nieves, ed., Breaking Ground: Anthology of Puerto Rican Women Writers in New York 1980-2012 (New York: Campana, 2012) reviewed by Carla Santamaria

“I wanted an anthology that would document the efforts of so many Puerto Rican women writers, surviving, educating themselves and flourishing in the demanding and exciting environment of the City,” declares Myra Nieves as her purpose in creating this anthology. … Continue reading

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Sheila Rowbotham, Lynne Segal, and Hilary Wainwright, Beyond the Fragments: Feminism and the Making of Socialism. Re-issued with new introductions (London: Merlin Press, 2013) reviewed by Evelyn Burg

Cuddling, Huddling, and Muddling Through Beyond the Fragments: Feminism and the Making of Socialism has a notable history. Its authors, Sheila Rowbotham, Lynne Segal, and Hilary Wainwright are well-established figures of British Second Wave feminism. They are also “libertarian” or … Continue reading

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