Category Archives: Volume 27, No. 3

D. H. Melhem 2

As a tribute to our late colleague, here are two poems from her last collection, followed by an appreciation by Robert Roth. The poems appeared in D. H. Melhem, Art and Politics / Politics and Art (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

D. H. Melhem 3

As a tribute to our late colleague, here are two poems from her last collection, followed by an appreciation by Robert Roth. The poems appeared in D. H. Melhem, Art and Politics / Politics and Art (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Christopher Z. Hobson, The Mount of Vision: African-American Prophetic Tradition, 1800-1950 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012).

Christopher Hobson’s Mount of Vision is a discerning and valuable corrective analysis of the role of the prophecy in African-American thought (and American society more generally). Hobson aims to change a common view that black American prophetic traditions led to … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Harilyn Rousso, Don’t Call Me Inspirational: A Disabled Feminist Talks Back (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2013).

Halfway through her memoir, Harilyn Rousso writes: . . .I have learned to choose my words carefully. . .  my words are sparse as I try to second guess what other people would want or need me to say and … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Gene Holland, Nomad Citizenship, Free-Market Communism and the Slow-Motion General Strike (Minneapolis: Minnesota University Press, 2011).

In their final collaborative book What Is Philosophy? (1994), Deleuze and Guattari codified their project by distinguishing the concerns of philosophy from those of art and science. Art, they argue, concerns itself with the preservation of blocks of sensation; it … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

George Yancy, Look, a White!: Philosophical Essays on Whiteness (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2012).

W.E.B. Du Bois famously described the consciousness of African Americans as double, as always seeing oneself through the eyes of another — both subject and object, a subject under subjection and an object of objection. It is a powerful articulation … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Larry Patriquin, ed., The Ellen Meiksins Wood Reader (Leiden & Boston: Brill, 2012)

Within the first pages of The Time Machine (1895), H. G. Wells quickens the conceptual engine of his plot by explaining that objects exist not merely in three familiar spatial dimensions but in time, as persisting entities. “‘Clearly,’ the Time … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

D. H. Melhem 1

As a tribute to our late colleague, here are two poems from her last collection, followed by an appreciation by Robert Roth. The poems appeared in D. H. Melhem, Art and Politics / Politics and Art (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Striking Back: Novels of Class Conflict by Two Proletarian Women Writers

For the first time since the General Strike in Britain in 1926, the two biggest member unions of the national Trades Union Council (TUC), Unite and Unison, which together organise over three million private and public sector workers, have called … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment

Limits of the Game of Masks: Class, Ethno-religious Identities, and the Rise of Salafi-Jihadism in Northern Nigeria

The intermediary bourgeois (our ruling elite) cannot claim political leadership openly on the grounds that he is, or wants to be, an exporter, shareholder, rentier or rich bureaucrat. He has to take over as a Muslim or Christian. He has … Continue reading

Posted in 63, Volume 27, No. 3 | Leave a comment