Category Archives: 59

Occuprint: Archiving the Future

Following on the heels of the Arab Spring, the disappointments of the Obama Administration, and economic turbulence on scale with the great depression, Occupy Wall Street (OWS) burst onto the scene last September, announcing itself with the now iconic image … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

S.S. Prawer, Karl Marx and World Literature

Perhaps the most crucial lesson that arises out of the dialectical materialist method designed by Marx and Engels is the contradiction between capitalist social relations, based on the hierarchy of ownership over labor, and what Marx calls “human emancipation,” or … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

John Marsh, Class Dismissed: Why We Cannot Teach or Learn Our Way Out of Inequality

The financial crisis of late 2007 and its aftermath highlighted the scourge of unemployment and underemployment. While the cascading effects of economic insecurity continue to ruin millions of families and individuals already on the margins (not least because of the … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Jaafar Aksikas, Arab Modernities: Islamism, Nationalism, and Liberalism in the Post-Colonial Arab World

Jaafar Aksikas’s book represents an important contribution to cultural studies. It offers a full-length assessment and critique of the works of three Moroccan intellectual activists as representative of three different Arab ideologies or projects of modernity and modernization in the … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Daniel Geary, Radical Ambition: C. Wright Mills, the Left, and American Social Thought

Although C. Wright Mills died in 1962, his sociological legacy remains a contested subject in the discipline. Mills continues to be controversial because he argued that sociologists could make a major contribution to public understanding if they rejected the boundaries … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Malcolm Bull, Anti-Nietzsche

French Theory, and by extension postmodernism, as the cliché goes, is nietzschean. Malcolm Bull’s Anti-Nietzsche attacks not Postmodern Theory, but its favorite German. Nietzsche’s popularity, as Bull has it, rests on the history of his readers believing themselves to be … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Samir Amin, Global History: A View from the South

Samir Amin offers a comprehensive view of his work, bringing together his earlier publications into an analysis that moves from the introduction of his conceptual framework, through a presentation of the shape of the tributary and capitalist world systems, to … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Michael Perelman, The Invisible Handcuffs of Capitalism: How Market Tyranny Stifles the Economy by Stunting Workers

At times of high unemployment like the present, workers who complain about their working conditions are encouraged to be grateful that they have a job. This is the sentiment expressed both in everyday conversations and by the media. Michael Perelman, … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Reflections on Marx and Marxist Theory

Eric Hobsbawm’s How to Change the World is a powerful text that arrives at a needful moment in history. In the wake of the 2008 financial collapse and with the Occupy movement challenging capitalist hegemony, it is indeed time, as … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment

D.H. Melhem, Art and Politics/Politics and Art

The back cover this eighth book of D.H. Melhem’s poetry posts this trenchant observation by fellow poet Philip Appleman: Belying all of prior literary history, a currently fashionable critical dictum holds that any poetry engaging the real world is necessarily … Continue reading

Posted in 59, Volume 26, No. 2 | Leave a comment