Category Archives: Volume 25, No. 2

Martin Carnoy, Cuba’s Academic Advantage (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2007)

Over the past thirty years, when researchers and educators visited classrooms in Cuba and in other countries, Cuban pupils in every grade seemed to know much more math and seemed to read better. In the late 1990s, an international organization, … Continue reading

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Michael A. Lebowitz, The Socialist Alternative: Real Human Development (Monthly Review Press, 2010)

Venezuela’s Bolivarian Revolution has been blazing the path to a 21st century socialism, a socialism that puts in first place human development rather than development of the forces of production or bringing them under state control. This has required a … Continue reading

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John Gerassi, editor and translator, Talking with Sartre: Conversations and Debates (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009)

From the imaginary “crabs” which haunted him in his earlier years to his belief that the US was more capable of starting a nuclear war than the Soviet Union, these conversations with Sartre by John Gerassi attempt to pin down … Continue reading

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Antonio A. Santucci, Antonio Gramsci (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2010)

Antonio Gramsci has long been regarded as one of the most creative political theorists since Karl Marx. In the social sciences and in Marxist circles, Gramsci’s writings prefigured modern-day discussions of topics such as uneven development, ideological hegemony and contradictory … Continue reading

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Michael E. Brown, The Historiography of Communism (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2009)

From David Harvey to Slavoj Žižek, Marxist thinkers have addressed the question of how to organize effectively against the most recent crisis in capitalism, which many agree will inflict greater devastation than the crisis of the 1930s. To this end, … Continue reading

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José Saramago, The Notebook. Translated by Amanda Hopkinson and Daniel Hahn (London: Verso, 2010)

In September 2008, the Nobel Prize-winning Portuguese novelist, playwright and journalist, José Saramago, went online at the age of 85 and for the first time in his life began writing a blog. This encounter with what he called “the infinite … Continue reading

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Al Sandine, The Taming of the American Crowd: From Stamp Riots to Shopping Sprees (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2009)

Early in this book Sandine gives a brief account of the Baltimore bank riots of 1835, in which politically connected bankers who had cannibalized the Bank of Maryland, making off with the savings of its depositors, were treated to a … Continue reading

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Carl Mirra, The Admirable Radical: Staughton Lynd and Cold War Dissent, 1945-1970 (Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 2010)

I enjoy opening my introductory History classes by telling the students, “I study the past because I am interested in the future.” Carl Mirra’s careful intellectual biography, covering the first half of Staughton Lynd’s adult life, reveals a scholar-activist who … Continue reading

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Steve Early, Embedded With Organized Labor: Journalistic Reflections on the Class War at Home (New York: Monthly Review Press, 2009)

Only Steve Early, writing about the recent succession to the Presidency of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), could have written: [T]he process of replacing [Andy] Stern has been about as transparent as the College of Cardinals’ method of picking … Continue reading

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“Welcome to Europe”: Photos by Piet den Blanken

Piet den Blanken’s photographs of migrant workers and asylum seekers show the reality behind the European Union’s bogus internationalism. The situation for would-be migrants has deteriorated significantly since these photos were taken, and in particular since uprisings and destabilisation in … Continue reading

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