Category Archives: Volume 17, No. 1

The Truman Nelson Reader

Truman Nelson Revisited The Truman Nelson Reader. Edited by William J. Schafer. (Amherst, Mass.: The University of Massachusetts Press, 1989). While recently reading an anthology of W.E.B. Du Bois’s newspaper columns (from radical left publications of the 1950s and early … Continue reading

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Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America; Race, Class, and Power in the Alabama Coalfields, 1908-21

Elliot J. Gorn, Mother Jones: The Most Dangerous Woman in America (New York: Hill and Wang, 2001) Brian Kelly, Race, Class, and Power in the Alabama Coalfields, 1908-21 (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2001). John Sayles’s 1987 movie, Matewan, captured … Continue reading

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Black Radical Theory and Practice: Gender, Race, and Class

This essay is an analysis of Black feminist interventions into the Black radicalisms of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The focus is on certain strands of Black radicalism, especially the Black revolutionary nationalism which emerged in the United … Continue reading

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Regional Equity as a Civil Rights Issue

The color line in the U.S. is nowhere more visible than between its cities and its suburbs. Urban America, comprised largely of people of color mired in poverty, is the flip side of White suburban prosperity. Gentrified urban neighborhoods and … Continue reading

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American Identity and the Mechanisms of Everyday Whiteness

The events on and after September 11, 2001 have intensified global economic and political reconfigurations that have been under way over the last thirty years. These transformations have shifted the balance of public opinion in the United States from a … Continue reading

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Racism and Ecology

One of the remarkable findings about the ecological crisis is that race and ethnicity are more reliable predictors of environmental pollution than class and income. Thus a relatively more affluent black community is more likely to suffer a toxic waste … Continue reading

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The Crisis of White Supremacy

[Ed. note: This article is an edited transcription of a talk given at the Brecht Forum in January 1998. Although the main ethnic/geographic targets of the U.S. government’s “concern” have shifted somewhat since that time, we believe that the underlying … Continue reading

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The Hidden Half-Life of Albert Einstein: Anti-Racism

In a game of free association, if I say “Einstein,” what’s your response? Probably “genius.” Maybe “brilliant.” Possibly even “absent-minded professor.” But few, if any would say, “social activist” or “human rights advocate,” and virtually nobody would say, “anti-racist.” Yet, … Continue reading

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The Reparations Movement: An Assessment of Recent and Current Activism

Yusuf Nuruddin interviews veteran activist attorney, Muntu Matsimela, and veteran activist scholar, Sam Anderson, organizers of the Reparations Mobilization Coalition, for their analyses and candid impressions of the current status of the reparations movement. This interview was conducted on December … Continue reading

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Erupting Thunder: Race and Class in the 20th Century Plays of August Wilson

Near the turn of the century, the destitute of Europe sprang on the city with tenacious claws and an honest and solid dream. The city devoured them. They swelled its belly until it burst into a thousand furnaces and sewing … Continue reading

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