Notes on Contributors

Mat Callahan is a musician and author from San Francisco who currently resides in Bern, Switzerland. His musical work includes award-winning albums and collaborations such as founding legendary artists’ collective Komotion International. He is the author of numerous books and articles, most recently The Trouble with Music (AK Press, 2006). <http://www.matcallahan.com/>; <info@matcallahan.com>

Hester Eisenstein is a professor of sociology at Queens College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and a member of the S&D editorial board. Her books include Contemporary Feminist Thought (1983), Inside Agitators: Australian Femocrats and the State (1996), and Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Are Using Women’s Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World (2009). She has taught at Yale University, Barnard College (Columbia University), and the State University of New York at Buffalo; she also has served as a “femocrat” in the state government of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. <hester1@prodigy.net>

Andrew Kliman, author of Reclaiming Marx’s “Capital”: A refutation of the myth of inconsistency (Lexington Books, 2007), is a professor of economics at Pace University in New York, and co-editor (with Alan Freeman) of Critique of Political Economy, a new online scholarly journal. His writings, talks, and interviews on the current economic crisis are archived at www.akliman.squarespace.com/crisis-intervention. <akliman@pace.edu>

Joel Kovel is the author, most recently, of Overcoming Zionism (Pluto) and The Enemy of Nature (Zed). He is active in the movements of Palestinian solidarity and ecosocialism. <jskovel@earthlink.net>

D. H. Melhem, poet, novelist, and scholar, is preparing her eighth poetry collection. Working title: “Art and Politics / Politics and Art.” For bio, see S&D #48 and www.dhmelhem.com; <dhmelhem@worldnet.att.net>

Gregory Meyerson is co-editor of the Marxist online journal, Cultural Logic, and has published numerous essays on Marxism, critical race theory, post-structuralism and American literature. He is coauthor with Michael Roberto of It Could Happen Here: Fascism and the Decline of the American Empire, forthcoming from Pluto Press. He teaches critical theory, American and African American literature, as well as composition at North Carolina A & T University. <gmeyerson@triad.rr.com>

Rohit Negi is a graduate student in Geography at Ohio State University. His interests are in historical materialism and postcolonial studies. His dissertation research concerns the economic geography of copper mining in Zambia, its articulations with the state, and (uneven) developmental impacts. <negi.2@osu.edu>

Michael Joseph Roberto is Assistant Professor of History at North Carolina A & T State University, where he teaches contemporary world history and the history of socialism. With Gregory Meyerson, he is co-author of It Could Happen Here: Fascism and the Decline of the American Empire and “Fascism and the Crisis of Pax Americana” (S&D #47). He has a forthcoming article on Marx’s concept of progress in Science & Society, and is also writing a political biography of H. Smith Richardson, a major backer of conservative political initiatives in the US. <robertom@ncat.edu>

Jonathan Scott is the author of Socialist Joy in the Writing of Langston Hughes, as well as many articles on literature, culture, and politics. His study of the great Palestinian writer, Emile Habiby, is part of a new collection entitled Embargoed Literatures. He is a professor of writing and literature at Bronx Community College. <jonascott15@aol.com>

Jeffrey Shantz is a long time community organizer and rank-and-file union activist. He was for several years a member of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty and host of the “Anti-Poverty Report” on community radio. He currently teaches at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver and is helping organize against the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and Whistler. <der_einzige@hotmail.com>

George Snedeker teaches at the State University of New York/College at Old Westbury. He has published scholarly articles in the areas of sociology and literary criticism as well as short stories and poems. His book, The Politics of Critical Theory, was published by Rowman & Littlefield in 2004. <snedekerg@verizon.net>

George Wallace is author of eighteen poetry chapbooks and two CDs, and editor of numerous poetry publications. He is a frequent performer nationally and internationally. He has appeared at the Beat Museum, Woody Guthrie Festival, Howlfest, Shakespeare & Co, and the Dylan Thomas Centre. Winner of the CW Post Poetry Prize and the Poetry Kit Best Book award, he curates poetry reading series at the Bowery Poetry Club and Cornelia Street Café in New York. In 2003 he was named the first poet laureate of Suffolk County NY. <poetrybay1@aol.com>

Victor Wallis, the managing editor of Socialism and Democracy, teaches in the department of Liberal Arts at the Berklee College of Music. His writings on ecology and technology have also appeared in Capitalism Nature Socialism, Monthly Review, Organization & Environment, and the Historisch-Kritisches Wörterbuch des Marxismus, and have been translated into nine languages. <zendive@aol.com>

Nadya Williams visited Viet Nam for three months in early 2008. She is a former Asia study-tour coordinator for Global Exchange (a San Francisco-based human rights organization). She is an active associate member of Veterans for Peace, San Francisco chapter, and an associate member of Vietnam Veterans Against the War. She is on the national board of the New York-based Vietnam Agent Orange Relief and Responsibility Campaign. Her first demonstration against the Viet Nam war was in 1963 at the University of California at Berkeley. <nadyanomad@gmail.com>

Richard D. Wolff is Professor of Economics Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is also Visiting Professor at the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School University in New York. His most recent work, with Stephen Resnick, includes New Departures in Marxian Theory (2006) and a documentary film on the current capitalist crisis, “Capitalism Hits the Fan” (www.mediaed.org; www.capitalismhitsthefan.com). He also writes regular short pieces of current economic analysis for the Monthly Review webzine at <www.monthlyreview.org/mrzine.com>; <rdwolff@worldnet.att.net>

Raúl Zibechi is editor of the International Section of the weekly Brecha (Montevideo); he also writes for La Jornada (Mexico City) and the International Relations Center (Silver City, NM). He received the 2003 Jose Martí Award from Prensa Latina (Cuba). He is a professor and researcher at the Popular Education Center of the Multiversidad Franciscana de América Latina. He is the author of several books on Latin American social movements, most recently Autonomías y emancipaciones: América Latina en movimiento (Mexico: Bajo Tierra, 2008). <zibechi@internet.com.uy>

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