Notes on Contributors

Elan Abrell is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) and a teaching adjunct at CUNY’s Hunter College. He holds a JD from Boalt Hall School of Law, the University of California at Berkeley (elanabrell@gmail.com).

Douglass W. Greene graduated from Salem State College with a BA in History. He lives in Reading, Massachusetts (thed15@aol.com).

Matthew N. Lyons is a writer and archivist living in Philadelphia. He contributes to the anti-fascist blog Three Way Fight (www.threewayfight,blogspot.com) and is co-author, with Chip Berlet, of Right-Wing Populism in America (Guilford, 2000)
(matthewnlyons@yahoo.com).

Steve Martinot has been a human rights and anti-war activist for most of his life, as well as a union and community organizer. He has written extensively on continental philosophy, contemporary political economy, and the history of the structures of racialization and white supremacy in the US. His last two books are The Rule of
Racialization and Forms in the Abyss: a philosophical bridge between Sartre and Derrida, both from Temple University Press (marto@OCF.berkeley.edu).

Holly Martis is a student at Hunter College, the City University of New York. She is currently working on a research project on the relations between English literature and the 17th-century land enclosures, and also a series of short stories about capitalism and interpersonal relationships (hlmartis@aol.com).

Gregory Meyerson is co-editor of the Marxist online journal, Cultural Logic, and has published numerous essays on Marxism, critical race theory, post-structuralism and American literature. He is coauthor with Michael Roberto of It Could Happen Here: Fascism and the Decline of the American Empire, forthcoming from Pluto Press. He teaches critical theory, American and African American literature, as well as composition at North Carolina A & T University (gmeyerson@triad.rr.com).

Michael Joseph Roberto is Assistant Professor of history at North Carolina A & T University, where he teaches contemporary world history and the history of socialism. With Gregory Meyerson, he is co-author of It Could Happen Here: Fascism and the Decline of the American Empire. He is currently writing about Marx’s concept of progress, and is also preparing a political biography of H. Smith Richardson, the Vick Chemical Company magnate who created the Smith Richardson Foundation, a major backer of conservative political initiatives in the US (mrobto@aol.com).

Jonathan Scott is the author of Socialist Joy in the Writing of Langston Hughes (University of Missouri Press, 2006), as well as many articles on American literature and culture. He is currently working on a historical novel of Bacon’s Rebellion, and also a history of the Midwestern intellectual tradition. He teaches writing and literature at Bronx Community College (jonascott15@aol.com).

Kam Hei Tsuei was born and raised in Hong Kong. She writes on politics and culture for the journal Chickenbones. Her 2006 essay “Chinatown Blues” was selected by the journal as one of its ten best of all time. Among her current projects is a study of the radical Chinese filmmaker Li Yang, as well as a brief history of Chinese-American racial politics in New York. She is the director of City English in Brooklyn, where she has lived for the past ten years (minnatsuei@aol.com).

Mike Whitney graduated from St. Michael’s College in 1975 with a degree in English literature. For the last twenty-five years he has been running his own landscaping business in Snohomish, Washington. He spends most of his time researching and writing about the financial industry, civil liberties and politics (fergiewhitney@msn.com).

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